Generation Games

On Wednesday 11th July, the generation gap between young and old was successfully bridged during an afternoon of exercise and games held at Withernsea High School.

Run by members of the school’s Sixth Form, and open to retirees from across Holderness, ‘Generation Games’ offered a platform for the older generation to socialise, exercise and engage with younger members of the community.

Upon arrival, guests were treated to a traditional school dinner which was served to them by the Sixth Form students. This informal introduction offered the perfect opportunity for the two age groups to mingle prior to taking part in the exercise sessions.

After lunch, the guests were taken to the school’s Sports Hall where they were split in to small groups to take part in a rotation of activities including seated bowls and indoor curling. Groups were awarded points for victories within each activity and prizes for the most successful teams were presented at the end. 

Although initially planned as a one-off, the success of the event and the overwhelming positive response received from its participants means there are already plans in the pipeline for a similar event towards the back end of the year.

Generation Games was organised by the school in partnership with Sport Play and Development, City Health Care Partnership, NHS Health Trainers and East Riding of Yorkshire Council. Leading the organisation in school was Teacher of Dance and Sixth Form link Jamie Hughes.

Mrs Hughes commented: ‘I am delighted with how well the Generation Games afternoon was received by our guests. It was a real pleasure to see different generations of our community, who would not normally have an opportunity to interact in such a way, enjoying themselves and supporting one another

Elderly members of any community can be at risk of feeling isolated and lonely, which is why events such as these are vital in establishing supportive links and friendships. 

It was particularly pleasing to see positive interactions forged between the younger and older generations. As always, our students did both themselves and the school proud. We look forward to hosting similar events in the future and establishing further links in our wider school community.’

At the end of the event, participants completed feedback sheets to share their thoughts on the day. Choosing to remain anonymous, one person wrote: ‘Meeting different people, especially the students in their school environment, was an excellent experience. It has made my attitude towards younger people more positive and if they are indicative of the younger element of society, we are in good hands.’

While another commented: ‘Interacting with strangers of different ages in a pleasant atmosphere was a wonderful experience. I now feel I have more friends.’

Around 25 members of the community took part, with organisers hopeful of increased numbers at the next event.

Further details regarding this will be announced in due course.