Year 8 students experience a day in the life of the NHS

On Monday 18th November, ten Year 8 students visited Hull Royal Infirmary where they enjoyed learning about the wide variety of careers available within the National Health Service.

Now in its fifth year, the ‘A day in the life of the NHS…’ event offers students an interactive insight in to how different roles within the NHS work together for the health and well-being of patients.

Students were given an opportunity to get hands-on with specialist equipment and watched a full surgical team operate on a dummy patient. A demonstration to illustrate the effect of cataracts was used to simulate the coordination difficulties experienced by older patients and students were also given an opportunity to practice their CPR skills.

Reflecting on the visit, Year 8 student Hannah Lessells commented: ‘I really enjoyed this amazing experience. I was very interested by the operating theatre and learning about the many different jobs available.’

Savannah Harman added: ‘I found the theatre part of the experience quite interesting and being able to watch how surgery is done really amazed me. At the minute, I’m still not sure about my future career but this experience has made me consider my future options.’

Rhianna Foster commented: ‘Before attending the event I really didn’t know what I want to be when I’m older. But now that I’ve heard of the apprenticeships on offer within the NHS, it has given me something to think about.’  

The ‘A day in the life…’ event is a collaborative effort between health and education organisations across Hull and East Yorkshire which aims to inspire young people to pursue a career in the NHS, boosting future recruitment for the next generation of NHS staff.

Deborah Lowe, Lead for Nursing and Quality Improvement at NHS Hull Clinical Commissioning Group, said: ‘There is a huge and diverse range of roles within the NHS and engaging with children at a young age around these career options is a fantastic way to encourage them into a potential career in health across Hull and the East Riding.’

Leading Withernsea High School's involvement in the event was Teacher of Science Ian Dyke who commented: 'As ever, all our students were a credit to the school in their behaviour, enthusiasm and willingness to participate. The event was run by professionals from a wide variety of backgrounds and gave a real insight into future opportunities. Everyone agreed it was an enjoyable and valuable day and our thanks go to the organisers.’